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applies only to ethics laws, not public records access laws. >> miss herrick for her part, all be ignores campaign and government code 4.105 d. states that the ethics commiting shall investigate complaints under the section that alleged violations of local campaign finance lobbies and financial interest and government ethics laws, which commissioner hur pointed out. however, section 4.105 a, states. any person can file a complaint with the ethics commission alleging that a city officer or employee has engaged in improper activity by, again, violating campaign finance lobbying, conflicts of interest, or government ethics laws, regulations. the difference between them is that the complaints can be filed under 4.105 a. alleging many different violations of improper activities but under 4.105 d, not all of them are investigated pursuant to procedures in c3699-13. so the whole thing in my opinion is moot. . i believe that miss herrick, may have also have wrongly claimed that the california evidence code 1040, and its definition of official information, may have been misquoted and she may hav
in the sunshine ordinance and the incorporation of the state law with some exceptions. i'm looking very carefully at the summary of the complaints in the two memos from miss herrick and it seems to me that the extent to which there is an investigatory file at the city controllers office or that the commission has conducted an investigation, that those investigations are probably not subject to disclosure. but, the scope of the underlying request between the two offices related to the complaint seems to me to suggest a body of material that is beyond the investigatorry file itself and may include correspondence about the handling of the aspect and not the file itself and to the extent that any such records might exist, they to me, to my read might be subject to disclosure, albeit in a redacted form. i don't know if they exist, but that is my view on that with regard to any closing memo, if there was i don't know what the language of a closing memo offered by the commission staff regarding this complaint refers to. again, if such a thing exists if it is not otherwise made confidential, and i need t
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
of bias. and i think that is... i think that is clear that there is going to be some perception. the law does provide, though, that even some perception of bias is permissible in a situation like this where you have no legal conflict and we really don't have other options that would allow us to have somebody else adjudicate it. >> may i complaint on that point? >> you will have that opportunity, mr., shaw. so, i am not sure that we have a choice. it doesn't sound like we have a choice. and i, i don't think that an advisory opinion will be particularly helpful if we have to readjudicate it. >> i agree. >> i am not sure that this is, where they have to make determinations related to the executive directors that they hire and work with and conduct business together, that they investigate harassment complaints, whistle blower complaints they seek outside of the council to do that if they are well-organized. but they handle those because it is their job to do so. and i... so i raised it because we do want to be careful and thorough. but i think at this point it might make sense to proceed wit
law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy of free will and human control on the criminal side versus the civil side and not surprisingly on both sides "the state wins" because on the criminal side you go to prison and on the civil side, you get incarcerated civilly. >> i don't think that's much of a disconnect. i think -- so i agree with you the test has changed. that's not what i'm talking about. if you look at the kind
telling city bodies that not following the law as written, is wrong. and quit advising them to do it. this also referred to the district attorney office as well as this. >> good evening, commissioners, my name is dr. derek kerr. and i have comment that relates to the executive director's report and your annual report to the board. as you know, protection of whistle blowers is one of your mandates, it is in article four of the campaign and government conduct code. but your work in this area is invisible. there is nothing about whistle blower retaliation in your minutes for the last seven years, or your director's reports, or your annual reports. recently the controller's whistle blower program has been reporting retaliation complaints. 17, this year, none substantiate. since 1995 none have been by this body. each year you are required to provide a report to the board of supervisors. one requirement is that you note the number of complaints that you have received. another requirement is to report, the type of conduct complained about, unquote. and so please consider adding whistle blow
and determine whether any documents in it are must be disclosed under state law. and that is what the ethics commission does. so i think and i hope that answers part of your question. the second part and maybe this responds, is when the ethics commission investigates allegations of sunshine allegations involving other departments, they may, depending on the discorrection of the investigate or to review the documents that were not disclosed in order to determine what to do and how to proceed in their investigation. i think in this case, miss herrick could seek to review the files of the ethics commission to determine whether those files are documents that must be disclose under state law. i can speak for the whistle blower program. >> miss herrick, did you review the documents in the possession that were maintained by the ethics commission related to this matter? >> i did not. and just in response to your... all of your questions, we did talk a bit about, apen disd3, 699-1 3a of the city charter which does make the city records confidential. and consistent with any advice that we would get fr
public records laws and then continuing the hearing for a determination on the remaining documents, the correspondence between the two departments is that right? >> i guess that is right. yeah. >> sir, sir, public comment is closed. mr. shaw i will give you a minute, and i am not sure what you have. >> i just want to note, mr. gibner indicated that miss herrick was stepping into the shoes of the executive director, right? >> can you get to your point, please? >> you are going to let the acting in the shoes executive director, determine herself the contents of those files? why can't you carve out the time and you examine them? so that it is not a member of the staff filling in for something the ethics commission apparently doesn't want to do itself? >> you would rather have us review the documents? is that your position? >> absolutely. >> you could use a hearing officer. >> sir, not i am going to hear from you. >> i am not going to hear from you, please, shut down. >> i want to object to one thing only. >> if i let you speak everybody has to speak. and we are not going to go forward
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
>>> my name is mary numyer. i live in washington but met chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very po
on together but he proactively came for this bill, s.b. 1506, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that f
working on an administrative issue through law school and was very interested in how admissions worked and how students did after they graduated and it didn't take long to sort of look at what was happening, to sense something like "mismatch" might be important. we were admitting large preferences, and 90% chance of graduating only a 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. that meant only 45% of students we were admitting actually went on to smoothly go through law school and get their law degrees. wasn't hard to look at other schools in los angeles where students wouldn't have gotten in without references to see that those students had better outcomes. us started looking into this and look for a relevant database to test this and in 2004-2005 developed the paper that first discusses the issue in law school context and found this is quite a large problem, nationally the great bulk of minority students especially african-american students were receiving large preferences on a scale of a couple hundred spt points. traits were generally poor for this group. only a third of black starting
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
joined the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san franc
organization and san francisco law enforcement, i will create an atmosphere of trust and cooperation in the district that will lower street crime and gang violence and above all i will help san francisco to be a leader. we will build bike lanes that will connect the city and reconnect the parks and find new ways to power our city in a way that is better for the planet and for our own wallets. i am not alone in having the vision for the future of san francisco that i do, i'm extremely proud of the people and organizations that have endorsed my candidacy because they share the hopes and the dreams, and the passion of the people that i have always depended on. they are far apart from one another on individual issues but they share my belief that working together we can achieve anything. my supporters include, california attorney general har ris, state senator yen, rashelle, norton, wynn, they gave me their sole number one endorsement and i am the only one endorsed by the police officer organization, the lgbt club and the firefighter unions and the chronicle who called me the candidate b
of the biggest tax increases since 1980 facing us. >> huge. >> if, under current law, nothing is done. we have a list of these tax increases. >> the lowlights. >> yes. expiration of the bush cuts, a lot of the tax increase. the personal income tax brackets which are now going to pop up again, taxes on investment, a lot of of the obamacare taxes, 22 billion starts this year. that includes the new tax on investment there. >> 3.8% on people who make above $200,000, and medical devices, one of the most -- a real growth industry. >> i mean, that's one of those that you can't figure out how that became law but it did and we have to live with it. i want to emphasize, we get idea to talking about ten-year plans. this is in 2013, 500 billion -- you're talking about a tax increase of over 3% of gdp. so this is a massive blow to the economy that is going to happen unless congress acts or we get a new president with a new direction. >> steve, you talked to a lot of people in the business community. how are they reacting to this prospect? is this affecting the chance we could go over this tax? is it affect
and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but we need to do more. let's work with all stakeholders to assure that rules are based on fairn
boots on the ground and will at the political level to enforce the law and appears that we need state level support as well. >> thank you, so this is a big picture question. miss dillon. >> what do you think that the legislature can do to address the systemic problems with the finances. >> that is a big picture question, it is a tough question. i think that in the long term a lot of the problems that we have here in the budget relate to the ease at which citizens can put ballot box budgeting measure into his our state rule books and they don't sunset and the legislature has increasing little control as well as the government what can and cannot be cut every year. this is a problem that is not caused by democrats or republicans or the structure of our system. that is one thing that i would try to change is have legislation passed that would allow any such provisions that are sponsored by citizens and maybe even provisions that are sponsored by legislatures such as a senator to sunset or be examined regularly by some type of a commission. as to whether they remain valid. that is the big
and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current a
of wrong dog. >> do you have not think that a man who has been found guilty by due process of law ought to be slightly penitant? >> if it is in fact due process. you see, jeremy, your problem is you have no idea how that system operates. and you should know something about that. >> you're the one who chose to locate his business there. >> i did, yes. >> were you just foolish or what? >> in fact, i'd say that's slightly overstating it, but i made a mistake. i underestimated the vin at and corruption of the american legal system. i confess to that. i'm very penitant about it, too. >> what's astonishing is a man who has been through this should show no humidity and no shame. >> of course not. i've been persecuted half to death. i don't have any shame. i'm proud of having been in a u.s. federal prison and survived as well as i did. i had no problems whatsoever, not in the regime and not amongst the fellow residents. let me tell you something -- i am proud of having gone through the terribly difficult process of being falsely charged, falsely convicted and ultimately almost completely vindic
is the way that you over turn a lawful election, not this put together, jury-rigged mistake for a procedure that you somehow tried to publicly defend. and if you break it down another way, we stand with your 17 employees in this report, 352,000 dollars per employee per year. and i will be honest with you, i come to these meetings and i can't see you doing a damn thing to make this city any more ethical, or any more open, in fact, what you just did in the last case was say, well, we are... we have not seen the file, and they won't tell us what is in the file, we don't know what is in the file, we don't know whether it is confidential or not, but we are going to find that the people being charged for withholding documents are not guilty and then we will go and look to see if there is anything in there that might be. talk about back asswards that is... >> now let me just... is there any other public comment on this? >> you know, let me just say, i did not reiterate the analysis that was provided by miss herrick in the memo and that she stated in response to the questions, but there is an impor
to comply with the law beyond those levels for further action. so, we're asking -- >> for november 13th? >> beg your pardon? >> you plan to present that november 13? >> no, r i'm planning to present the actual plan and a resolution november 13th. this is -- this give you the information behind it. >> ahead of time? >> yes. >> okay. so, the commission will adopt the procurement plan november 13th? >> if you're comfortable with it, yes. >> but i'm not clear on this. what would the commission workshop november 23rd? >> that's today, that's what we're doing right now. >> oh, this is the workshop? >> this is the workshop. >> i didn't realize that. >> this is the discussion. >> welcome to the commission workshop. >> yes, it's your workshop. [laughter] >> we have this year -- excuse me, in 2011, just to take that policy proposal that i just put before you and describe what it means to us. in 2011 it was a wet year. there would have been no additional rps purchases needed to comply with the law. the calendar year we're in right now, 2012 is more of a dry year. and we have some plant outages. we
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, but they were demagogue is racist, racist, racist. when nixon says law and order we know what is really talking about. instituted by bye bye reagan-bush judges and rudy giuliani, bless his soul from new york city, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was finally reformed tens of thousands of black lives were saved in a different way. welfare was so successful in law and order bills were so successful they were claiming credit for both. so we had 12 years of paradise within the chapter, post-o.j. paradise and many wonderful things that happened. most of all people were not walking on egg shells anymore. add to the list of words you just mentioned. people would worry about that you would innocently say a word and it he would ruin your career and you would be hated by all of humankind. that was over after oj and a lot of the change after oj was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago and along comes barack obama the most li
if the court continues down the path of sitting dog sniffs are not searches at all, law enforcement will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable
. states can independently pass laws. they have the power to award electors. the winner of the natural popular vote, if and only if there are states with 270 electoral votes making the same pledge. you are not going to be a sucker. you have created a compact. eight states have done that in the district of columbia, if i'm not mistaken. we don't need a constitutional amendment? >> it wasn't just my idea. my brother, co-author -- >> the brothers. all right. >> for this idea. we can talk about -- so far, the states that have gone for it are democrat states. >> thanks for being here. appreciate it. >> all right. the second term agenda for barack obama. that's next. ngs! a mattress. a sausage link. mermaid. honey!? driftwood. come on, you gotta help us out here a little. [ male announcer ] febreze eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ [ male announcer ] febreze. eliminates odors and leaves carpets fresh. ♪ [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected
to the domestic workers i am an attorney who helps workers, and enforce their rights on the federal and state law and i think that it is important that those rights be respected. he posed the question to the authors of that law in vetoing it as to what is the impact going to be on some of the elderly and the sick who rely on home care workers in particular, and i guess the governor, a democrat found that legislation to be too broad, too enerous and em posing more requirements on the small businesses than was necessary and asked that a more tailored and more appropriate set of legislation come back to him on that subject and i would agree with that. >> mr. leno. >> i supported both of those bills with regard to the domestic workers' rights bill. we heard so many horror stories in the committee hearings. if you could imagine being in the employment and not being able to take the kinds of breaks for meals and for rest, even to have an 8-hour workday, it is a different kind of employment, so it is not as easily tailored to the kind of worker protection rights that we expect in every other industry. s
will do it consistent with law and also as wisely as we possibly can. also wanted to make sure this wasn't just a bunch of words. we wanted it to be structured in such a way that somebody could audit it and could go in and take a look at our performance and say, you set out to be good guys, how have you performed against that? as we stand before our rate payers to be able to say, we have committed to managing your money well, we have been audited by the controller against our objectives, and we have an answer on that. hopefully that answer will be that we have met and exceeded all of those objectives. so, i think it's very important. and i think over the course of the last year, the various drafts of this policy have improved significantly, and i think it's been worth that time. i also wanted to note the comments that we received from cac and -- especially chc had a bunch of recommendationses that deal with rate setting. that is not the particular purpose of this policy. we do have a rates policy. i think they raise some great questions, and i think it would be well worth our time to tak
, we follow the law if we have to and you say, well here is what the law says and the person sits there and looks down. read the 150 word summary thing in the minutes, it is pretty clear. and i would like to ask you something if we ended up in court and i subpoenaed all of you, and before a jury, or a lawyer got up and said, what did that 150 word summary should be in the minutes mean to you? and does it make any sense that the city attorney said that you could put it somewhere else? i think that you would have a hard time answering that question, wouldn't you? >> a motion to adjourn the meeting? >> i would like... >> so moved. >> second. >> second >> all in favor? >> aye. >> aye. >> opposed, hearing none, the meeting is adjourned. >> [gavel] >> good afternoon. welcome to the board of supervisors meeting for the city and county of san francisco home of the national league champions san francisco giants. it is tuesday october 23, 2012. madam clerk can you please call the roll. >> supervisor avalos. present. >> supervisor. >> go giants. supervisor cohen. cohen present. supervi
macroscopic bodies traveling at great times of light and free space . the laws of motions and bodies post of light and free space are relative mechanics, quantum mechanics". evidence confrontation. imperialism and followers and national and sovereign survival contest continuum. revolution, revolutions to end capital currency and for public ownership of means of production, cooperative collective community. to think this matter in labor classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, dialect tal materialism. >> next speaker. >> you know joseph spoke with pharaoh and told him the dream is one. god showed pharaoh what he's about to do. the seven cows or seven years and the seven ears and he doubled it because it was surely going to happen, and it did happen, and hopefully they can read this. okay good. last time it was so bright you couldn't read t i did a really lousily job. hopefully i will improve but what i tried to explain last time i was here is that the bible itself establishes this period of time to the dus trekz of the temp and to christ and had these years so in round numbers it was
about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solutions. that involves a discourse with policy makers. as people of color, we need to be accountable and
to prosperity. hardly had the one before they were quarreling. memo we see violations of the law by all the political forces in the government as well as the opposition. of course, other new opposition parties are cleaner and more honest, but that is probably because they are still new on the scene. >> the activists publicized their findings in leaflets and on the internet. of the 400 delegates currently in parliament, the group rtifieonly two as honest. e others are too busy with their private businesses to show up for plenary and committee meetings. his lawyer activist wants to sit in parliament herself. her companions perform street theater, parodying situations every ukrainian is familiar with, the seemingly hopeless struggle against speculators and conflict with highhanded police officers and officials. a residential complex, the civil servants, was supposed to be built on the spot, despite citizens initiatives against it and monument protection laws. tatyana manage to stop it, but the new critics of the system around hospitable republic have no illusions. >> i would be the only de
. they passed 26 laws in hundreds of states. they have here a woman who is attacked, called a slut for wanting access to contraception and a candidate that just said, i wouldn't phrased it that way. exactly how would he have phrased it? >> that's a false narrative. >> i don't want to get off the topic of women -- okay. i will give you that time. i want to get to the impact on swing voters so-called by "the new york times" waitress moms and what is this going to do to the pitch battle in ohio, in florida, in virginia for women voters in the united states. >> we see the so-called waitress moms. we love the heart of tagging that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to c
to the military budget is the controversial bill which congress passed and the president signed into law last year to confront the nation's looming $16 trillion debt. the law requires automatic across-the-board cuts on january 2, 2013 that will slash billions from the defense budget. in battleground states like, virginia, where as many as one in four adults work for defense contractors, which build enormous sub marines like the minnesota which is about to be christened these defense cuts could mean as many as 200,000 jobs. it was designed to be so bad we would never get to this point. mike is ceo for huntington ingalls industry. with 37,000 employees in virginia, mississippi, laz and california it is the largest u.s. naval ship builder. >> all of the usual is suspects are saying all of the things that they were predicted to say. it is not the way the nation should be going about deciding how to allocate its resources. >> congressman randy forbes for the fourth congressional district in virginia. >> it is going to be devastating to the economy of virginia. it going to be devastating to the economy
there was a difference between criminal law and tort law it was called intent if you accelerated somebody that was not murder now there is a man in jail southern mississippi 10 years without parole for putting clean fill dirt on his land sometimes it is moving dirt from an area to another. some was well intended the clean water act says you cannot dump pollutants per kriet agree. no chemical company should be allowed the nine your own land is not the same as dumping chemicals. >> host: and utilities and the senate? >> i brought the peg family from idaho ss of new $5,000 per day fine and told they cannot build on their land no water touches there they and it there's no rainwater new government said it is a wetland. looked at the website. it is not there. they say the website is not perfect. another family were raising bunnies and fined $90,000 with the rahm license. they had one. they said pay as within 30 days with your credit card. 90,000? but if not the fine is 3.1 million. these of the stories that should make americans mad and say no more. a big government run amok. >> what is your bi
>> why are critics charging that the healthcare law is music i want some more. what's he doing? but he can't. look at him! it's just not done. please sir, i want some more. more? more? more? please sir. he has asked f... thank you. what? well he disay please... sir. yes he did. and thank you. yea. and thank you. he's a wonderful boy. (laughing) a do-lightful boy. please and thank you. pass it on. (crowd of children) thank you. crilticings slamming the health care law. they are labeling itaxpayer nded bribe. you agree with t criticings. >> this is cronyism, cheryl. the president goes around with a bag of goodis and hand out. cheap loans for students and solyndra for the greens and of urse, this extra payment for medicare patients? and paying some doctors more to treat patients mor for two years and a total arbitrary confing plan instead of addressing the entitlement. is getting votes in the process. >> it is only a temporary measure and only lasting two years. >> johnathon tagged approximate right. confusing is the worse. they are saying details are yet to be worked out. the administrat
the list, there are many. there is the san francisco charter, there is the budget laws and policies, the debt laws and policies, the environmental justice policy, the community benefits policy, the fund balarie serve policy, the rates policy and the land use framework. and i go through that long list because it does provide assurances and many of which are very targeted and deliberate because of your oversight and your desire to have them. so, i think that was helpful. and i think the citizens advisory committees, the revenue bond oversight committee and the rate fairness board appreciate that and knowing that and going through that list as well. in addition to the goal that i know you and former president moran had, the assurance of transparency, we also reviewed what transparency and oversight we have now. and that includes your oversight as well as the mayor's office, the board of supervisors, the rate fairness board, of course the citizens advisory committee and all their subcommittees, which are very helpful and informative and the policy process and the information process. th
have strong connections with the city. my wife went to college here. my brother went to law school here is still practices here million diss sun does live in the city with his family. my wife has aunts and cousins so i have a strong connection to atlanta. tonight i will discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union 18631861. more specifically what abraham lincoln and rejected any meaningful compromise following his election the country was gripped by a crisis because they feared lincoln it was the number party and probably sell. it did not have a significant connection lincoln was elected without a single electoral votes without the slave states and own the for border states and they are merely a handful. for the first time in nation's history to be taking over the executive branch of the national government. in the south major institution is the republicans' determination into a unit to win a national election without southern support republicans condemned the south as undemocratic. even un-american. with this party on the threshold for those who practice the gospel and new
law- enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drawn in think of military drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. of this is an increased interest with the use of small aircraft could expand. >> is already out there is not going to go away. this was just a test but they would like to see these deployed sooner than later. in dublin, kron 4. >> here is a look at
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on the back of the workforce, and there was prop c. prop b was the adachi measure and proper c was a lot of pension reform where the unions and the
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i think i was 12 years old. so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't really even know what that was until i actually got the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going to
the healthcare law pushed through without considering republican options. and i think that poisoned everything for moving forward. so i would strongly disagree with that in terms of he had plenty of chances to deliver on the promises he made and he didn't. and during that period he chose not to work with republicans. host: next up is fill in north carolina on our independent line. caller: i just wanted to say that despite the media blackout gary johnson is going to have a profound impact on this election. he's got my vote because the democrats talk peace and kill 178 children with drone warfare in pakistan and they say that's not tough enough. and i don't know how many dead children it would take to satisfy mitt romney and the republicans. guest: talk to us about the effects as you see them of third party candidates on the republican effort in north carolina. guest: right now from what we're seeing it doesn't look like it's having an impact. to the extent they are drawing folks out it's from both parties and doesn't look like it's going to impact the presidential race or other races where libe
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